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Resources

We invite you to view our recent reports & articles. The opinions listed do not necessarily reflect the views of the whole firm.
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This report, developed with support from the Ford Foundation, highlights 11 communities from across the country that have conceptualized and deployed community wireless networks to achieve different goals. In addition to offering case studies of the 11 communities, the report examines the evolution of wireless technology and explores lessons learned by communities that have implemented these networks. Check out Best Practices in Community Wireless. This document summarizes the best practices identified by interviewees of the report. Further detail can be found in the report itself at the link above. Read more...

This report, developed with support from the Ford Foundation, examines successful technology innovation projects in health and human services, with particular attention on 11 ‘bright spot’ examples across the country. Lessons from these sites and other successful innovators provide an assessment of key challenges faced by would-be technology innovators in human services agencies, as well as useful strategies to be deployed in developing these projects. Check out Gaining Ground. Read more...

Commissioned by the Ford Foundation and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation This report investigates the talent pipeline that connects technology experts to careers in government and civil society, and provides an unvarnished assessment of the current state of the pipeline, key challenges and barriers to the development of technology-oriented human capital in government and civil society, models of successful interventions, and recommendations for a more robust pipeline. Read the full report here. Read more...

This Bloomberg Philanthropies report surveys the unique environment of public-private partnerships in New York City, identifying key lessons for those seeking to emulate the city’s success. The report draws on interviews with dozens of city leaders involved in these partnerships, including senior officials, agency leaders, philanthropists, business leaders, and community-based partners. Check out The Collaborative City. Read more...

This Democratic Leadership Council proposal calls for the current outdated, inefficient textbook system to be replaced with an eTextbook program. eTextbooks will be better for students and teachers, will save money after the first few years, and will help America become a leader in education once again. Check out A Kindle in Every Backpack. Read more...

This report for Women's Voices. Women Vote. suggests an ambitious policy agenda to address the needs of America's unmarried women. The agenda focuses on increasing the opportunities available to unmarried women to thrive economically in an turbulent economy. Check out Overlooked So Far: The Nation's Unmarried Women in 2008. Read more...

From Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity and Civic Enterprises This study examines U.S. media print coverage of the topic of poverty and politics from 2003 through 2007. Comparing the last pre-presidential year with 2007, we found a dramatic increase in the number of stories that mention “politics,” “candidate,” and “poverty.” Check out Issues on the Rise. Read more...

This memo presents findings from July 2015 polling on issues related to Internet access that was conducted by Anzalone Liszt Grove Research in collaboration with Freedman Consulting, LLC. It highlights a shared view that Internet access is essential and that Americans support actions by the government to increase access. The research demonstrates that nearly two-thirds think expanding Internet access should be a priority for the next president. Check out Americans Support Expanding Internet Access for All. Read more...

From The Center for the Next Generation Posted on The Center for the Next Generation’s blog: “We looked at all the media coverage of children and families issues from June to July and found that kids were definitely not on the press' agenda. The fiscal cliff, Social Security, and Medicare came up in news stories much more often, and although these all bear very heavily on the next generation, kids didn't enter into these discussions. Even Ann Romney's horse garnered more media attention than kids, getting nine times the coverage. Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes' divorce got over 200 times as much Read more...

By Thomas Z. Freedman and Michael Weinstein This Democratic Leadership Council paper proposes that policymakers consider expanding on a model program called Single Stop, an initiative piloted by the Robin Hood Foundation in New York and now being replicated nationwide by SingleStop USA. Check out Helping Americans Help Themselves. Read more...

From Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity and the Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation This study shows a steady and significant decline in U.S. print media coverage of the relationship between Gulf Coast poverty and hurricane Katrina. Coverage has dropped off significantly since the months following the storm and has paled in comparison with sports and celebrity news. Check out A Forgotten Crisis. Read more...

By Mark Penn & Thomas Z. Freedman This Democratic Leadership Council report describes the complex public opinions on globalization - how Americans feel a sense of optimism about the nation's future in a global economy and a sense of personal anxiety about how this new world will affect them. The polling includes an exploration of what policies and messages American officials should consider in order to ensure all Americans benefit from globalization. A brief synopsis of the research also appears in January 4, 2007 issue of Blueprint Magazine, under the article titled "The Politics of Globalization." Check out The Emerging Politics of Read more...

USA Today – May 14, 2010 By Sam Gill As a former Rhodes Scholar who weighs 150 pounds on a good day, has a vertical leap under an inch, and probably couldn't run 40 yards in under 10 seconds if my life depended on it, I finally figured out why my career in professional football never got off the ground. I was too smart. That, at least, is the now widespread criticism of Myron Rolle, a former Florida State standout who decided to forgo the 2009 National Football League draft to study medical anthropology at the University of Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship. During the recent 2010 NFL draft, Rolle Read more...

This Democratic Leadership Council report presents a menu of new policy ideas designed for state and local leaders on dealing successfully with the challenges of globalization. The book, with a forward by the current Treasurer of Delaware and the Governor of Iowa, is divided into three sections: ideas for raising the bar in education, supporting growth and empowering workers in the economy, and new policy ideas for improving state and local security. Check out Winning America's Future. Read more...

This Partnership for Public Service study examines U.S. media print coverage of the topic of poverty and politics from 2003 through 2007. Comparing the last pre-presidential year with 2007, we found a dramatic increase in the number of stories that mention “politics,” “candidate,” and “poverty.” Check out Covering Katrina: Trends in Katrina Media Coverage. Read more...

This Progressive Policy Institute paper describes recent public opinion surveys showing that voters care much more about the issues of poverty and hunger in America than conventional Washington political wisdom acknowledges, and are anxious to hear original formulations and solutions. The analysis suggests lessons for building a new majority. Check out Poverty and Public Opinion. Read more...

This Partnership for Public Service report is a survey of graduating college seniors in 2005, the first graduating class to have had their entire collegiate career after September 11th. The goal is to provide an authoritative and informative look at how 9/11 has shaped their worldview, influenced their thoughts on public service, and informed their upcoming career choices. We believe that it will serve as an important resource for government leaders, policymakers, journalists, and others with an interest in this unique class of young Americans. Check out Class of 9/11. Read more...

By Joel Berg and Tom Freedman This proposal is contained within the Progressive Policy Institute's Memos to the New President, a collection of proposals intended to aid the new president as he tries to move America forward and solve the major crises facing our nation. Tom and Joel's piece offers a five-step plan to achieve the president's goal of ending childhood hunger by 2015. Read the full chapter here. Read more...

By Tom Freedman This piece is part of the Center for American Progress' Change for America: A Progressive Blueprint for the 44th President, which calls on various thought-leaders to contribute their ideas on how the president can move the country forward. Tom's contribution details how the president can benefit from using a strong Domestic Policy Council to steer the White House agenda. Read the full chapter here. Read more...

Washington Post - February 2, 2007 By Thomas Z. Freedman If the House and Senate are able to agree on a minimum-wage hike and the president signs the bill, some may say we will have done enough to help low-income workers. It's true that low-wage workers urgently need a raise, that millions of Americans work full time and still live below the poverty line. But while an increase in the minimum wage is better than nothing, alone it is an incomplete instrument for really making work pay. We should raise the minimum wage while committing our country to a bigger bargain: If you Read more...

Politico - March 21, 2007By Warren Bennis and Thomas Z. Freedman Amid the horse-race-like coverage of the 2008 presidential campaign and its focus on topics such as electability and likability, it's worth considering which candidate would make the best leader and president. At the end of the day, voters won't be having a beer with the next president, but we will depend on him or her to be a great leader and deal with the daunting challenges of globalization and terrorism. American history offers some clues about qualities that tend to show up in our great leaders. Here's a scorecard of Read more...