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Articles

Anyone who tells you with confidence what is going to happen next is lying, guessing, or blissfully ignorant. My favorite statistic from reporting after the Trump election was how few predictions of his victory there were during the general election. One list found 11 correct public predictors, including an evidently well-known Chinese monkey. The most famous public prognosticator on the list? The creator of the “Dilbert” comic strip. While almost everyone now remembers themselves as being prophetic and all-knowing back then, they’re wrong. And it’s a fair bet that wisdom is just as wrong today. Even apparently scientific information can no longer be Read more...

Foundations That Care About the Spread of Ideas Should Finance Journalism

Foundations That Care About the Spread of Ideas Should Finance Journalism By Matt James and Bill Nichols As foundations and nonprofits continue to think through the new political reality, much of their collective mindshare is being spent on a central conundrum: How do organizations that focus on big issues support and promote their causes in a world where, seemingly, facts don’t matter? How do they ensure that the public is getting the information it needs to support informed decision making and understanding the consequences of major policy shifts? We would argue that facts matter more than ever in an environment of proposed sweeping Read more...

Voters agree: A free and open Internet is crucial to our economic future

San Jose Mercury News - December 29, 2014 By Tom Freedman, Alan Davidson, and Alexander C. Hart As we look to the New Year, we should recognize that there is a new trend in politics. The digital world isn't just changing the way election campaigns are run; it is also changing the way voters think. From specific issues like net neutrality to a general willingness to support building our national communications infrastructure, this trend will change American politics. Immediately after the 2014 elections, we conducted a national poll of midterm voters. Digital voters, those who spend more than three hours a day on Read more...

Missing from State of the Union: Obama’s audacity of hope — to help ‘most vulnerable’

The Christian Science Monitor - January 26, 2011 By Daniel Altschuler and Sam Gill In a speech as significant as the State of the Union, what is left unsaid matters as much as what is said. Last night, President Obama laid out a clear charge: to “win the future.” Focusing on the steps to help America compete in the 21st century, the president outlined a vision to “out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world” in order to secure greater prosperity for all. Yet the modest sampling of policy proposals seemed to pivot away from the ambitious attempt to take on long-term problems Read more...

How can Democrats stop the Republican tide this election? Young voters.

The Christian Science Monitor - October 28, 2010 By Daniel Altschuler and Sam Gill As 20-somethings, we are often accused of having an exaggerated sense of self-importance. But this political season, we have every reason to be self-absorbed. After voting for Democrats in record numbers in 2008, our generation has retreated from the political arena, and the Democratic Party has failed to bring us back. Losing our generation may now cost them control of Congress. Just how crucial is the Millennial vote to Democratic success? Consider this: If young people voted in this upcoming election at the same rate as in 2008, it Read more...