Freedman, Author at Freedman Consulting, LLC
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Author: Freedman

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Philanthropy has turned its eye toward developing the field of public interest technology, citing public interest law as an example of how philanthropy has successfully jumpstarted a now- robust field. While it may be tempting to proceed onwards satisfied with the knowledge it can be done, now is a key moment to pause and understand how it was done. This memo, written for the Ford Foundation in 2016, outlines lessons from key investments made by philanthropy in developing the field of public interest law. Read more...

this report "The Building the Future report made a strong case for the need to create a community of practitioners invested in exploring and building the nascent field of public interest technology. Through 17 in-depth interviews, academics and practitioners shared that a key barrier to growing the field was a lack of shared principles, goals, or even a definition of public interest technology as an academic discipline." More. Read more...

Anyone who tells you with confidence what is going to happen next is lying, guessing, or blissfully ignorant. My favorite statistic from reporting after the Trump election was how few predictions of his victory there were during the general election. One list found 11 correct public predictors, including an evidently well-known Chinese monkey. The most famous public prognosticator on the list? The creator of the “Dilbert” comic strip. While almost everyone now remembers themselves as being prophetic and all-knowing back then, they’re wrong. And it’s a fair bet that wisdom is just as wrong today. Even apparently scientific information can no longer be Read more...

Nearly 41 million Americans were impoverished in 2016, and the United States continues to have one of the highest poverty rates of any OECD nation. The impacts of the Great Recession are still being felt across the country, and the 2016 presidential election brought a new focus on the rural poor and the so-called “white working class.” Despite the issue’s importance, new research from Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity shows that the nation’s most prominent newsrooms have not given significantly more attention to poverty since 2007. While poverty coverage has increased for some news outlets over the past ten years, Read more...

Americans overwhelmingly support net neutrality principles and oppose efforts to repeal the FCC’s 2015 Open Internet rules, according to a recent nationwide poll on technology policy conducted by Civis Analytics. The poll also found a broadly shared belief across party lines that the internet is essential in the 21st century and that government has a vital role to play in expanding internet access, including by providing subsidies to help low-income Americans afford access. Online privacy remains a significant concern, and the public resoundingly believes that the lack of competition among internet service providers (ISPs) and media companies is harming consumers. Check out the Read more...

Foundations That Care About the Spread of Ideas Should Finance Journalism By Matt James and Bill Nichols As foundations and nonprofits continue to think through the new political reality, much of their collective mindshare is being spent on a central conundrum: How do organizations that focus on big issues support and promote their causes in a world where, seemingly, facts don’t matter? How do they ensure that the public is getting the information it needs to support informed decision making and understanding the consequences of major policy shifts? We would argue that facts matter more than ever in an environment of proposed sweeping Read more...

(Freedman Consulting, LLC) The report Swiping Right for the Job: How Tech is Changing Matching in the Workforce was produced with the JPMorgan Chase Foundation and examines how labor market matching technologies have changed interactions between employers and job seekers, focusing particularly on the obstacles that low- and middle-skill workers face in accessing and using technology to find careers. The report also outlines best practices for the design and implementation of labor market matching technology to ensure these tools can have their greatest impact. Read more...